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(showing articles 5681 to 5683 of 5683)

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Seattle's #1 Weekly Newspaper. Covering Seattle news, politics, music, film, and arts; plus movie times, club calendars, restaurant listings, forums, blogs, and Savage Love.

older | 1 | .... | 283 | 284 | (Page 285)

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    The good, the bad, the queer AF. by Anonymous

    You know you want to.
    You know you want to.

    Hey ya’ll, how[’s] [was] PRIDE?

    Want to tell us about it?

    Now is your CHANCE to give us the dirt on all your Pride fun in the summer sun—the missed connections or sexual escapades with attractive strangers, the fabulous drag shows, the terrible heat and/or traffic, the annoying straight people, the Grindr adventures, how you danced until dawn (or even how you fell asleep watching RuPaul’s Drag Race and missed all the action). Or anything that’s on your mind, really!

    Email your stories/rants/raves to:

    ianonymous@thestranger.com

    And remember, it is always and forever COMPLETELY anonymous…so your red state relatives will never know what you’ve been up to!

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    by Erik Henriksen

    hero.jpg

    This week's entry into the illustrious genre of Indie Movies About Sad Old Men, The Hero follows Lee Hayden (Sam Elliott), a 71-year-old movie star who's keenly aware that he's about 40 years past his prime. Pros: Lee gets to hang out all day getting stoned and watching Buster Keaton movies with his buddy/pot dealer (Nick Offerman). Cons: Aside from shilling for barbecue sauce, he's not getting much work, and he's got a nearly nonexistent relationship with his daughter (Krysten Ritter, at her Krysten Ritteriest). So, you know: pretty old, pretty sad.


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    by Charles Mudede

    Here are best films made about black American worlds, and in this order:

    To Sleep With Anger - Charles Burnett

    Devil In A Blue Dress - Carl Franklin

    The-Color-Purple.jpg
    Moonlight - Barry Jenkins

    Do the Right Thing - Spike Lee

    The Color Purple - Steven Spielberg

    Daughters of the Dust - Julia Dash

    Killer of Sheep - Charles Burnett

    She's Got Have It - Spike Lee

    Eves Bayou - Kasi Lemmons

    Fences Denzel Washington

    As you can see, there is only one white director in this list. It's Steven Spielberg. Elizabeth Banks apparently has never heard of his film The Color Purple, otherwise she would not have made the statement that Spielberg had never made a film with a female lead. Indeed, not only does the film have females leads, it launched the career of a black woman, Whoopi Goldberg; claimed the best performance of an American (and black) icon, Oprah Winfrey; and is based on a book by one of the three black women writers (Alice Walker) who revolutionized black American literature in the 1970s (the other two being Toni Cade Bambara and Toni Morrison).

    I will even go as far as to say that Steven Spielberg.'s adaptation is actually better than the book—which lacks the blues, the slow poetry, the pastoral beauty of the film. I will even go as far as to say that The Color Purple is (in terms of a work of art) Spielberg's best film. Banks' line of attack exposed her ignorance (and, according to The Root, privilege).


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older | 1 | .... | 283 | 284 | (Page 285)